Technology: South Korea uses technology to help pregnant women get seats

(From AP)

Before they show a baby bump, what some pregnant women in South Korea can expect when expecting is accusing glares when they take subway seats meant for pregnant, disabled or elderly passengers.

One South Korean city is testing a wireless technology it hopes can alleviate such problems and perhaps help address one of the biggest challenges facing the Asian country: a stubbornly low birthrate.

A woman sits on a special priority seat next to a metal bar attached with a "pink light" wireless sensor in a subway train in Busan, South Korea, on April 6. (Busan Metropolitan City via AP)

A woman sits on a special priority seat next to a metal bar attached with a “pink light” wireless sensor in a subway train in Busan, South Korea, on April 6. (Busan Metropolitan City via AP)

In April, the southeastern port of Busan, South Korea’s second-largest city, began testing a small, round device called a beacon. Equipped with a wireless sensor, it activates a pink light attached to another sensor installed on a metal bar next to special priority seats, usually at the end of subway cars. The idea is to alert all nearby that the person carrying the beacon has a baby on the way.

The “Pink Light Campaign” can help non-pregnant passengers who might be occupying a seat designated for riders who are expecting to yield the spot without having to guess, is she or isn’t she? In theory, pregnant women also can claim a seat without having to ask. Read More.



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