11 workers rescued from collapsed China mine; 18 still trapped

(From AP/Reuters)

Chinese rescuers pulled 11 workers to safety and located another 18 who were trapped after a mine collapsed in the eastern province of Shandong, state media said Saturday.

A trapped miner rescued from a collapsed gypsum mine in Pingyi County, east China's Shandong Province

A trapped miner rescued from a collapsed gypsum mine in Pingyi County, east China’s Shandong Province

The official Xinhua News Agency said all 29 workers were accounted for, although the 18 remained trapped at two sites and could not be immediately rescued.

The Pingyi county government said that the gypsum mine, owned by Yurong Commercial and Trade Ltd. Co., caved in on Friday and left 19 workers missing in initial tallies. The other 10 were rescued on Friday.

Gypsum is a soft sulfate mineral that is widely used in construction.

Xinhua said rescuers lifted one miner, whose leg was struck under a boulder, from the shaft on Saturday morning.

The mine collapse came just days after a landslide from a man-made pileup of construction waste in the southern city of Shenzhen killed two and left another 70 missing and presumed dead.

‘Safety breaches caused Shenzhen landslide’

On Saturday, a government website quoted local authorities as saying that the landslide caused by breaches of construction safety rules and was not a natural disaster.

Rescuers walk among damaged vehicles to search for survivors at the site of a landslide which hit an industrial park on Sunday in Shenzhen

Rescuers walk among damaged vehicles to search for survivors at the site of a landslide which hit an industrial park on Sunday in Shenzhen

An investigation by a team in Shenzhen directed by China’s cabinet found the Dec. 20 disaster stemmed from waste construction material in a landfill site rather than a natural geological movement, a statement posted late Friday on the cabinet’s website said.

“Those held accountable will be seriously punished in accordance with the law,” the statement said.

The man-made disaster, which buried 33 buildings in an industrial park, has raised questions about China’s industrial safety standards and lack of oversight that has led to fatal accidents, a by-product of the country’s rapid growth. Read More



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