Belgium hunts two new suspects linked to Paris attacks

(From agencies)

Belgian and Paris prosecutors have sought public help in hunting two new suspects involved in the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks in Paris who traveled to Hungary with Salah Abdeslam, a key suspect on the run.

An undated handout image made available Friday by Belgian police shows two new suspects in the November 13 terrorist attacks in Paris

An undated handout image made available Friday by Belgian police shows two new suspects in the November 13 terrorist attacks in Paris

The police warned public that the two are “dangerous and probably armed” and they should not intervene directly if they encountered either of them.

The two suspects carrying fake Belgian identity cards as Samir Bouzid and Soufiane Kayal went to Budapest with Abdeslam in a Mercedes on September 9. They were stopped at the Hungarian-Austrian border for checks.

Later, Kayal’s identity was used to rent a house in the Belgian town of Auvelais that authorities have searched as a possible site for making the suicide bombs used in the Paris attacks.

On Nov. 17, four days after the carnage, Bouzid’s identity was used to send 750 euros ($817) money order from  a Western Union office in the Brussels area to Hasna Ait Boulhacen, cousin of Abdelhamid Abaaoud, the alleged mastermind of the Paris attacks.

Both Boulhacen and Abaaoud died a day later when French police stormed their hideout in a Paris suburb, St Denis.

The latest suspects bring to four the number of individuals still being sought in relation to the Paris attacks.

The fourth suspect facing an arrest warrant is Mohamed Abrini, who was filmed with Abdeslam on November 11, driving a car that was later used in the Paris attacks.

France on Friday posted on the government website a “how-to” guide for surviving terror attacks.

It says citizens should “escape, hide, alert” in the face of danger.

Spurred into action by the Paris attacks, the interior ministers of the European Union moved Friday to grant law-enforcement agencies access to information gathered by airlines — data like passengers’ names, travel dates, itinerary, credit cards and contact details.

The sharing of such data is meant to allow better scrutiny of known or suspected extremists.

Under the passenger data deal, details would be collected from European carrier flights entering or leaving the EU, as well as from flights between member countries. Charter flights will be included, and all the information will be kept on file for six months.



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