Taiwan, China leaders to hold historic meeting in Singapore

(From Reuters)

Chinese President Xi Jinping will hold talks with his Taiwanese counterpart Ma Ying-jeou in Singapore on Saturday in the first such meeting of leaders from the two rivals since the Chinese civil war ended in 1949.

The unexpected but historic meeting carries risks for both presidents, political experts said.

A combination photograph shows Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou (L) listening to a question during an interview with Reuters at the Presidential Office in Taipei in this June 1, 2012 file photograph and Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) smiling before his meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China October 29, 2015 file photo.  REUTERS/Pichi Chuang /Muneyoshi Someya /Files

A combination photograph shows Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou (L) listening to a question during an interview with Reuters at the Presidential Office in Taipei in this June 1, 2012 file photograph and Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) smiling before his meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China October 29, 2015 file photo. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang /Muneyoshi Someya /Files

It comes at a sensitive time in Taiwan, with presidential elections being held on Jan. 16 amid rising anti-China sentiment, particularly among younger Taiwanese who worry about Beijing’s influence over the island and don’t believe Taiwan benefits from closer economic ties with its giant neighbor.

Ma’s office said in a statement the purpose of his trip was to “consolidate cross-strait peace and maintain the status quo”. Ma would not sign any agreements, nor issue any joint statements with China, it added.

Zhang Zhijun, head of China’s Taiwan Affairs Office, said the two leaders will “exchange views on promoting the peaceful development of cross-Taiwan Straits relations”, according to a statement carried by the official Xinhua news agency.

He called it a milestone in relations that will help manage conflict and disputes and would gain “wide support from all walks of life across the Strait and the international community”.

“This is a pragmatic arrangement made in accordance with the one-China principle under the situation where the political dispute across the Taiwan Strait has yet to be resolved,” Zhang added.

Ma, who is set to step down next year due to term limits, has made improving economic links with China a key policy since he took office in 2008. He has signed a series of landmark business and tourism deals, though there has been no progress in resolving their political differences.

China deems the island a breakaway province to be taken back, by force if necessary, particularly if it makes moves toward independence. No peace treaty has ever been signed to formally end the civil war.

TAIWAN OPPOSITION UPSET

Taiwan’s main opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), which traditionally favors independence, slammed what it said was a lack of transparency about the meeting.

Key parliamentary leaders had not been informed, DPP secretary-general Joseph Wu told Reuters by telephone.

“This kind of situation needs to be explained fully to the people and calm down the anxiety of the people in Taiwan that President Ma has not overpromised China anything that would hamper Taiwan’s current status and its long term interests,” Wu said.

The DPP’s candidate Tsai Ing-wen is favorite to win the poll in January. Tsai has said she will “maintain the status quo” but has not elaborated on how she plans to do so.

Experts said China could be trying to influence the election, adding Ma was taking a risk in meeting Xi with the poll only 10 weeks away. The move could also backfire on Xi if there was widespread opposition in Taiwan to the meeting, they said.

China could be trying to show that ties will improve if Taiwan continues to be ruled by Ma’s pro-China Nationalist Party, or Kuomintang (KMT), said Aaron Friedberg, professor at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University.

“It’s conceivable that they had something like that in mind. They may be rewarding President Ma for policies that he has pursued, that in general have tended to favor closer relations between Taiwan and the mainland,” Friedberg said.

Bonnie Glaser, an Asia expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said there had been a shift in public opinion in Taiwan toward more skepticism about the relationship with China.

“It’s hard to see how this (meeting) is really going to help his party remain in power,” Glaser said.

PROTESTERS AT PARLIAMENT

Small groups of protesters gathered outside Taiwan’s parliament on Wednesday, where the cabinet would meet with leaders of parliament and the island’s political parties to discuss the trip.

Ma will hold a news briefing on Thursday, the presidential office said.

Related storyTaiwan opposition says Ma-Xi meet should not be used as an election ploy



Categories: China, Top News

Tags: , , , ,