China envoy blasts Japan at UN for ‘evading’ history

Beijing’s disarmament ambassador on Thursday accused Japan at a UN committee of covering up wartime history, including the use by the Japanese army of chemical weapons in China and its use of Chinese citizens in testing biological armaments, Kyodo reports.

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“Seventy years after the war, Japan is still going to great lengths to cover up and evade history,” Fu Cong said, adding that numerous “heinous crimes” had caused the “horrendous” suffering of Chinese and other victims of such weapons.

Japan’s disarmament envoy Toshio Sano stressed that his country had expressed “deep remorse” for the past and has “followed the path of a peace-loving nation that contributes to the peace and security of the world.”

Fu also cited what he sees as moves towards revising Japan’s Constitution, saying that “on the peace-loving country that they claim that they are, trying to amend the peace constitution is not a show of a peace-loving country’s normal behavior.”

Fu claimed that the number of civilians killed due to the Japanese army’s germ warfare crossed 1.2 million, which he said was four times higher than those killed in the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings.

Sano responded by calling into question the figures Fu provided, saying Japan did not have “concrete” records.

Fu said: “China stands firm in upholding the victorious outcomes of World War II and the post-war international order, and firmly opposes any devious act aimed at denying or distorting history.”

He also called on Japan to “face up to the history and genuinely reflect on its war responsibilities, and take concrete steps to win the trust of the neighboring countries and the international community at large.”

Fu’s criticism of Japan comes on the heels of strong remarks he made also at the UN General Assembly’s First Committee on disarmament issues Tuesday.

He spent much of his speech calling attention to what he saw as a potential security threat stemming from Japan’s stockpile of nuclear fissile materials, which can be converted into weapons.

He also said that some “political forces” in the country are pressing for nuclear armament.



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